3 films for the planet that you need to see this holiday season

Aside from all the usual holiday, girl meets boy, comedy ensues, they fall in love etc. Movies you may get dragged into, perhaps this holiday season is the time for something more meaty! (stay with me vegetarians)!

2020 has given us time to reflect, if you’re thinking has brought you to a place where you want to evaluate your impact on the planet, and you’re looking for New Years resolutions for 2021 that don’t involve joining a gym, look no further.

These three movies will make you think seriously about the environment, and your kids can enjoy them too. What would you be willing to do it you know there were only 60 years or harvests left?

2018 documentary directed by John Chester

1. The Biggest Little Farm

I watched this on a plane a couple of years ago, when I got home I sat down with Tara and see insisted she it too.

Based on a true story, the movie drew me in with a story about a couple who adopt a dog called Todd. He was easy to buy into being black with bright blue eyes. Todd accelerated this couples plans for leaving the city, for the country life in California. The move involved buying a farm where The soil was barely soil.

Dry barren land, that seemed as though it was hopeless. in fact the past few owners had failed to successfully the land work The story follows Todd and his humans along their journey into permaculture farming, showing the pitfalls and triumphs along the way.I challenge anyone to watch this film and not came away feeling inspired about how working with nature can yield transformations in more than just the soil.
Available on Netflix and Amazon Prime Video

Want more on transforming soil?

2020 documentary directed by Rebecca Harrell Tickell and Josh Tickell

2. Kiss the Ground

Narrated by woody Harrelson, the film leads the viewer by the hand, demonstrating that a solution for getting the carbon from the atmosphere back the soil where it’s needed is both simple amd possible. The process reduces global warming, produces oxygen, and reduces carbon dioxide in a massive way.

I confess, this movie blew my mind. I sat there thinking, “why aren’t we doing this? It’s not a spoiler to say it boils down to money and a splash of “this is how we’ve always done it,” but infact this isn’t how we’ve always done it, we just have to look back far enough.

If you have children this is a must see.
Food security is the issue of our time, but those of us living in wealthy nations like Canada who are w(for the most part) not impacted on the daily. I’m not talking about food bank line ups here, I’m talking about not being able to grow enough to stock supermarkets or food banks!
Available on Netflix

Need a scientist to lead you on your way? Number 3 is for you.

2020 documentary, directed by Alastair Fothergill, Jonnie Hughes and Keith Scholey.

3. David Attenborough: A Life on Our Planet

His “witness statement” for our planet.

Well known for nature programs an a voice that will lull you to peaceful sleep, Attenborough guides us through his 60 year career as as a naturalist, demonstrating the decline in the health of our planet and its inhabitants over time.

Attenborough shares his vision for how things could be, and calls us to action, with a plan for how to stop the destruction and get back to how things should be, if this, our island home is to survive.

Available on Netflix

I hope these documentaries will leave you with New Years resolutions that are not just good for you, but also good for the planet.

Bokashi Composting Review

variety of green plants

I was skeptical when the Bokashi Composter first came home, but I’ve become a convert. this is the best way I’ve found to accelerate the composting process and be able to compost in an apartment.

Traditionally, you need a yard and space to get a decent compost heap going, but above all, you need time. We live in 850 square feet in Vancouver and consider ourselves very lucky. We love to Garden and have a huge garden box that takes up most of our outdoor space.

Compost and garden supplies are expensive, and while we’re able to compost via a bin in the recycling room, nothing beats using our scraps to make compost that we don’t have to buy. The goal initially was to make the garden cheaper, the result is that it’s less work than going downstairs.

So what do you do? In a nutshell you take your food scraps and chuck them in the composter instead of the bin downstairs. Add some of the Bokashi bran and wait. The official wait time is 4-6 weeks. We live in Vancouver and maybe it’s our climate but it generally take a bit longer, I like to leave it 8 weeks if I can.

After its had two weeks in the bin with the bran, I drain the liquid (Which can be used as a tea for plants when diluted) and mix it with reclaimed dirt from the planter box in a tote on the balcony. It smells pretty bad, but its worth it! 6 weeks later the earth and compost mix is a rich soil that can be used to start seeds or plant out mature plants, and what’s better is that after the initial investment it’s free!

How does it work? I think magic, but apparently it’s microbes. Healthy soil is full of it and kitchen scraps are what they like to eat, the Bokashi bran aids the process and speeds things up!

We’ve had our composter a year and got two bags of bran with it. I’m still working through the second bag. our “soil factory” (the tote) cycles through easily, its sealed so it doesn’t smell and irritate the neighbours and we haven’t spent a penny on compost in the last 6 months.

If there’s a downside, it’s the smell. It’s like sour fish garbage, but like our tote the composter is completely sealed so you’ll only get a whiff when you open it to deposit your scraps. We’ve found that thinks like nut shells and avocado pits take too long to break down but I generally add them anyway. When I add scraps I rough chop them first to aid the process. I wash our composter out whenever I empty it. It’s a quick rinse on the balcony, and it’s way better to do little and often, than leaving it until you can’t bare the smell, trust me.

Our composter came from “Bokashi Living” and we’ve found their service super fantastic. I’ve not shopped for anything else related to the composter since then so I can’t compare, but the experience was good. If we ever live somewhere bigger, I’ll probably get a second one. I know some people start out with two, so that they can keep filling while one is breaking down in it’s two week “sit” before it goes in the soil garden.

At the end of the day, our cash is hard earned, composting is always the right thing to do for the planet, but I’d rather find the saving in my wallet than give our food waste away.

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